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of lynching in america, and african americans who found ways to forgive. >>> major funding for "religion and ethics news weekly" provided by the indianapolis based family foundation dedicated to religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the jane henson foundation. and the corporation for public broadcasting. welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. final preparations are underway in washington, d.c., for the second inauguration of barack obama, taking place on monday, martin luther king, jr. day. the benediction will now be given by the reverend luis leon of st. john's episcopal church, where the obamas sometimes attend services. leon replaces evangelical pastor louie giglio, who bowed out after controversy erupted over a sermon he gave in the 1990s condemning homosexuality. myrlie evers-williams, widow of murdered civil rights leader medgar evers, will deliver the invocation and the brooklyn tabernacle cho
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
religious groups. in our guidance we also made it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
-- joined them in a march which honored dr. martin luther king, jr. and people of all races and religions would march together and many parents are bringing their children to pay tribute. >> it is really important for kids to know how far we have come and how much further we have yet to go so i decided to bring my daughters here so they could see the memorial. >> it's just basically freedom and we wanted to show his dream for all of us. >> reporter: they will be commemorating his dream and legacy and it would be hard to ask for a more gorgeous day out here. reporting live san francisco. >>> government buildings are closed for the dr. martin luther king, jr. holiday. state courts schools and credit unions are closed, post offices are also closed and mail will not be delivered today. parking meters in san francisco will be enforced. >>> now where a surf rescue is underway at this hour. this it is not far but a lot of crews are currently held on the beach. at least one surfer is stuck on the rocks in this area. you may recall this where four surfers were caught in a rip current on saturday b
. this is the history of africa and it goes back a couple of centuries. but today, to be a follower of the religion is to earn a death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. and of course, christians respond in kind with their colleagues in reprisal. put that level of intolerance based on ignorance has raised that such a pitch that if you open the papers at any time in nigeria of the church has been burned down, worshipers machine gunned, a mosque was burned down and worshipers were bombed out of existence. even within the muslim religion there are different grades of purity. one side considers the other not sufficient so therefore deserving of criminal censorship. but then i jeers censorship never has one single issue that leads to total destabilization of society. >> booktv is here at the national press club author night joining us now is the author of a first cameraman. what is your association with the obama administration? >> in 2008 on the campaign i was a personal videographer that i carried through the first two and a half years of the white house. the last cycle i did not work on the campai
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
where the problem lies. >> changing the mindset for us is about utilizing religion to highlight the at and it is where we incorporate face leaders. >> others question how officers will reasonably be able to make a distinction between arranged marriages and forced once. >> arranged marriage is one based on joyce and consent. at the other end of the continuum, you got forced marriage based on coercion and the rest. it is the gray area in between that will be a challenge for prosecutors and law-enforcement agencies to captor. >> the real power lies in the hands of children who some honey to find the strength to say no to the authority figures in their lives. >> in the third part of our series of women around the world, we will take to the afghan capital word gender violence remains a problem despite a 2009 protection law. we will follow one woman's quest for justice after daughter was killed by her husband. she says the murder could have been prevented if the police had done their job. it has been another day of chaos in europe as heavy snow disrupts transport across the region. 40
who join you on days like this. we have all races here. we have all rely johns -- religions. last year volunteers claimed the same lot to make it a useable space. >> manti te'o may be the biggest name but is he the only victim of this hoax? who else may have been targeted. >> you already know the ravens won. now you want the t shirt to prove it. >> and d.c. is the place to be on org today -- inauguration today. the big event isn't free. the cost you don't know about. that's coming up. >>> it's a problem that impacts nearly a million people. it's inflammatory bowel desease known as ibd. we're taking your call. exexperiments are standing by top answer your questions. today we are joined by dr. raymond cross spoasht professor at the school of medicine. what is ibd? >> ibd is comprised of crohn's and colitis. it's an autoimmune disease that affects the intestines. it can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, weight loss and intestinal symptoms that can affect the eye, mouth, skin. >> who gets it? is there a target audience? >> typically affects young people. average age of onset
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
not -- this is the supreme law of the land religion is part of me but it's not what i'm going to go to. he is not rick sanatorium he is a religious man. >> jennifer: sure, i get that. you are a performer. i'm curious what you thought about the performance of day, the delivery of this. normally you start a big speech with a couple of jokes. but you don't do that with the inauguration. >> not one president has ever told a joke in their inauguration. they tell jokes at the conventions, campaign trail, state of the union, even debates -- >> jennifer: it's so solemn. >> open a joke with what are all of you people doing my backyard something? [ laughter ] >> but i think president obama is savoring looking back at the crowd, that is human to me. he is a human being like all of us. >> jennifer: so this was also a -- these inaugural speeches some have been very brief, some very been very long. this was was 18 minutes. was it about the right length? >> i think so. jerry nabb the congressman from new york looks like he is falling asleep over and over. >> jennifer: yeah, we have his youngest d
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
of religion despite their religious heritage of the academe in america. also they don't prevent. their cause i socialists. rusher agreed with all of that. but, i think a greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law's 1954 book mccarthy and his enemies she's made some errors in judgment but that cause is really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher is in 1954, 55, 56. in the years where he turns from generic young republican republican as some to the hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of the conservative movement even before he founded the "national review" in 1955, but it was sort of -- it was disorganized, by the blight termite might be entrepreneurial individualistic. whitaker chambers had another way of describing it. it was like people popping out like rabbits. you never knew where they were coming from or where they were going. we might see a little of this today now and then. rusher is absolutely thrilled to hear that there is going to be a conservative weekly magazine. at the time, it was weakly. so when he hears
and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to speak to, as you see
it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to
to be a certain fitness level. you don't need to be a certain religion or philosophy, because it's a practice that combines everything that everyone needs, right physical exercise, philosophy guidelines for life, ancient wisdom, but it's also practical. the principles of t'ai chi you know informed by the movements that i was just doing, can transform your life, transform your health transform everything that happens to you. to kind of get us started, i thought i would tell you a little bit about where t'ai chi comes from, what's the origin of t'ai chi. and to do this, we have to cast our minds back almost 2,000 years to a time in ancient china when there was a terrible flood. the waters of the yellow river overflowed their banks wiping out whole villages and sending people into the countryside. and after the floodwaters receded, plague arose, such a terrible plague that the emperor himself decided to take his personal physician and send him out into the countryside to find out what made people so sick. the physician came back and he told t
a shortcut and he was interested in gold and spending religion, but primarily it is about spaces. whatever space is so valuable that then? wasn't just the food was terrible in europe. and it was, but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. each of these new spaces where the today. so that's one of the reasons by the trade became so valuable and people risk their lives to explore these themes. so after the conquest and colonization, exporting drugs back to europe in this hemisphere as well. by drugs i mean sugar, which many people consider a job, where we get from is definitely a drug. coffee, tobacco, tea and aphrodisiac spaces. these things became the developmental and system. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today. what was the colonial economy? these are all drugs. .. and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and of course of the fortunes that drove a lot in the european development. and so, long story short the reason have the world got colonized in some ways is because a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get up so there you have
. it was the first time discrimination had ever been used in the distinction between race, religion, etc., discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, by giving it a fame it started -- a name it started to have it own life. the ability of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin ha
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
civic religion. radical still in much of the world but seemingly ordinary people can govern themselves. if we can't all agree on that and celebrate that, at least once every four years then there's something wrong with our culture >> brown: we have music. we have poetry. we got everything. >> everything, everything, wonderful >> and inclusiveness. that was the theme from beginning to end. people who often had been left out. were included. >> brown: all right. richard north and smith, annette gordon reed and beverly gauge, thank you all three >> thank you. >> ifill: and for the other news of this day, we turn to hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: there was word today that three americans died in the hostage stand-off in algeria that finally ended over the weekend. a u.s. official told the associated press that seven other americans escaped. it started wednesday when islamist militants linked to al- qaeda attacked a natural gas complex near the libyan border. algerian special forces then launched a series of operations to retake the site. today the prime minister gave his first official d
we have a kind of americanized version of prosperity gospel religion in america, and yet micah asked the question how do you worship? do you worship with fatted calves or rivers of oil? you do justice and you love mercy and walk before god not arrogantly. that's micah's answer to the question. jesus puts another one. he says preach the gospel, good news to the poor, heal the brokenhearted, set the captive free. so i thought he was very profound in his prayer today, but i thought president obama back to that again delved deeply into the declaration of independence today much like dr. king did talking about the american promise, the big tent where you are gay or straight or whether you are black or white, whether you are in appalachia or selma, all are in and nobody is out. i thought that was the major thrust of that address today. >> thank you so much for joining us on this special day. and i'm delighted to say that having steamed through various traffic and con investigation, i'm joined by jonathan capehart of the "washington post" and julian epstein, both of whom are special and pre
of religion. and so we have this enormous, tragic history that all of us confront from whatever our backgrounds are whether we're white, black, hispanic, asian, whether we're muslim, jew or christian. the notion that, in fact, in the words of a great writer who happened to win a nobel prize, william faulkner, he said the past is never dead and buried, it isn't even past. and i think that all of us are confronting constantly our history. we're confronting the history of slavery in this country. we're confronting the history and problems that arose as a consequence of colonialism. we're confronting those scars of violence and oppression and struggle and difficulty and hope not only on the larger canvas of history, but also within our own families. and for me it was not entirely obvious how, in fact, i was going to be able to integrate and pull together all those different strands in my life. so part of my challenge growing up was to figure out how do i function as someone who is black but also has white blood in me, how do i function as somebody who with is american and takes pride an
inaugural was repairing, bind up the nation's wounds. he made multiple references to god and to religion and apropos that right now, myrlie evers-williams, the widow of medgar evers, who was slain 50 years ago in 1963 is giving the benediction for these ceremonies, and this is only the second time, by the way, that a presidential inauguration has taken place on martin luther king day. the first time, don, was when you were there in the white house in 1997 for president clinton. let's listen to miss williams. >> let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy, and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and a history of disinfranchised votes to today's expression of a more perfect union. we ask, too, almighty, that where our paths seem blanketed by thorns of oppr
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
where they can look at the blessing. >> i think that what's helping this family is their religion, their community. they're embedded in a community, and many people in this country are not. you know, there's been a tremendous loss of community and connections with people. so, you know, i would just say, you know, build up your community and your connections, because this kind of thing can happen to any one of us at any moment. >> salgo: i want to go back very quickly to this whole concept of complicated grief, or whatever you'd like to call it. there's this -- there's a list. extreme depression, focus on the loss, intense longing -- that just goes on, and you get stuck, i thinkwas the phrase that you used. if someone has these symptoms, what do you do about it? is there medical intervention that works? >> well, i think, first of all, all those symptoms are probably normal for a while. and what i really look at is, are they interfering with the person's functioning. otherwise, a lot of those things are normal and can continue for a long time. >> but i think when they're interfering
at them. it's our secular religion. that's what this day is. think of what an extraordinary moment it is. a person is a private citizen. they take that oath. they become the most powerful person in the world. they're finished. they go out. they go back out. and they're a private person again. almost no other country in the world is that possible. it's an extraordinary moment. >> i've been disappointed. a lot of people have been disappointed. if you read "the new york times" this weekend, how the president managed the office on a personal basis with members on the hill on both sides. are you hopeful that this president has learned from some of the mistakes of the first term and he's going to reach out more aggressively? even to his own party on the hill. >> well, i think he's a reflective person. he does think he's talked more than most leaders about what he did wrong the first term. that's not usual that these characters admit it and he has. i'm not sure how far he'll get reaching out to republicans. he's tried more than we know. they just didn't come sometimes. the democr
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)